Good habits

I was really disappointed with the Guardian today. After putting in quite a lot of effort into publicising the sad saga of benefit cuts, they went and shot themselves in the foot. Or rather showed their true colours in an article about the habits of CEOs.

The intro is so patronising and plain silly that it was hard for me to finish reading the article. It tries to make you feel sorry for the CEOs who have such a tough life. The authors sum it up by saying:

What’s the point of being rich and successful if you have to get up before dawn every day to answer 500 emails?

Well, what’s the point of waking up before dawn to work your butt off for a minimum wage? What work-life balance do you have when you are at the mercy of your boss whenever you need some time off suddenly (sick child, doctor’s appointment, boiler broken)? How do you explain your single-parent status when yet again you cannot work overtime at the drop of the hat? Or if there is no work to be done but you have to sit at your desk pretending to be busy? Or are constantly worried about your hours or salary getting cut and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it?

To save you the heartache, here’s how to become a CEO: be a natural early riser (if you cannot wake up by 6am without an alarm clock, you are doomed); being excited about your life/day apparently helps, too.

Of course, there are no details – vague stuff about checking emails and spending evenings and weekends with the family. No mention of the army of PAs, nannies, cooks chefs, gardeners and cleaners that make working 100 hours a week possible.